Posts under ‘Books’

Mark Perryman’s Summer Book Review

by Mark Perryman.

Don’t burn the books A scorching hot list of summer political reading selected by Mark Perryman A year ago as Labour sought to recover from the May General Election defeat halls were starting to fill up for Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership campaign rallies. But even as the halls got bigger and the queues round the block longer […]

Inspiration from the anonymous revolutionary, aged 16

by Jon Lansman.

If you need inspiration, try this. The words of published author (of The Anonymous Revolutionary) and blogger (on the themes of Marxism, communism, their significance and their relevance today) and Tweeter, Max Edwards, diagnosed with terminal cancer 5 months ago, aged 16, published yesterday in the Guardian. Readers of this blog won’t necessarily agree with every word […]

Is there a Scottish road to Socialism?

by Dave Watson.

‘Is there a Scottish road to Socialism?’ This is the question posed in the third edition of this SLR Press book. The format is the same – a range of contributors from across the left wing spectrum in Scotland attempt to answer this question. The last edition was in 2013, pre-dating the independence referendum and […]

Autumn books for the Corbyn effect

by Mark Perryman.

Mark Perryman from Philosophy Football provides a rundown of new books for the #jezewecan majority It would have taken a forecaster of the most extraordinary power to predict in the early days after the General Election when the Labour Right were rampant explaining Labour’s defeat on being too Left Wing that by September Jeremy Corbyn […]

Is capitalism “mutating” into an infotech utopia?

by Ann Pettifor.

I was privileged to be invited by the St. Paul’s Institute to discuss (on the 3 November) the thesis in Paul Mason’s recent book Post Capitalism: A Guide to Our Future with a keynote speech from the author. Mason’s book is both a riveting and intellectually exhilarating read. It challenged me at a range of […]

How the Blair Supremacy put Left MPs into a “sealed tomb” rather than purge them

by Alan Simpson.

As we witness Jeremy Corbyn struggling to create a culture of pluralism and democracy, it is instructive to compare this with the New Labour approach to party management in a book described by Luke Akehurst as “a brilliant read for anyone interested in history of Labour internal politics“. the author described it as a “rolling coup” […]

Left Book Club re-launch planned for autumn with first book on Syriza

by Newsdesk.

Former London mayor Ken Livingstone is among a string of authors set to be published by a new Left Book Club, which launches this autumn. A collective of writers, activists and academics have been working on the project with the radical publisher Pluto Press. The project aims to emulate the original 1936-1948 club in provoking thought […]

Mark Perryman reviews the best of this summer’s sports books

by Mark Perryman.

English football’s Premiership, the best league in the world? The same four clubs, well give or take one perhaps, could be jotted down on a scrap of paper every August with a cast-iron guarantee they will fill the Champions League places, year in, year out. Tedium: it’s the brand value the Premiership has become past […]

A manifesto of good reads

by Mark Perryman.

Mark Perryman of Philosophy Football selects his reading for the 2015 General Election Campaign The much-missed indie band, well by some of us of a certain age, Sultans of Ping, had a great line in one of their barnstormer numbers “I like your manifesto, put it to the test ’tho.” We are told in all seriousness […]

Labour’s Blues #3 – a coherent ‘anti-theory’ theory that must be challenged

by David Pavett.

In Labour’s Blues #1, I attempted an overview of the recent book Blue Labour – Forging a New Politics . This was followed by Labour’s Blues #2 in which I questioned the values of Catholic Social Teaching (CST) which  receives high praise in Blue Labour. In this last piece I return to the arguments of Blue […]

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