Posts under ‘Macroeconomics’

Why haven’t there been riots about endless austerity? That may be about to happen

by Michael Meacher.

One of the most remarkable facts about the British public’s attitude to prolonged austerity is the lack of the kind of open revolt which has been seen in so many other countries. In Greece it has led to the dramatic rise of Syriza under the dynamic leadership of the radical Tsipras who now has a […]

Cameron tries to blame foreigners for UK ‘recovery’ fizzling out

by Michael Meacher.

It’s a bit rich for Cameron, in his statement yesterday from Brisbane, blaming the world out there, particularly the eurozone, for the fading UK recovery when those countries are pursuing almost exactly the same economic policies as he is. That is relentless and unending austerity, which he conspicuously failed even to mention. Now that the […]

The rise and rise of Podemos: a movement for popular empowerment

by Mike Phipps.

One of the highlights of the recent AGM of the Labour Representation Committee was the address from Leticia Bernues Caudillo from Podemos which took 8% of the vote in the European elections and won five MEPs just three months after being founded. Podemos (“We can!”) was inspired by the radical left force in Greece, Syriza. It grew […]

The case for abandoning austerity is a no-brainer, mathematically, financially and politically

by Michael Meacher.

Labour needs a game-changer to settle the result of the next election once and for all. As it happens it has the perfect opportunity ready to hand. Osborne is foolhardy enough to announce six months before the election that he intends to impose further cuts of £25bn to get on track to eliminate the structural deficit […]

The honeymoon is over for Italian PM Mateo Renzi

by Tom Gill.

Thousands took to the streets of Milan and other cities on Friday in the first of union-led protests that will culminate in a general strike next month. At issue is the government’s labour counter-reforms that will make it easier for firms to fire workers, adding to the growing ranks of the precariat in the Eurozone’s […]

Central banking, state capitalism, and the future of the monetary system

by Ann Pettifor.

The role of commercial and central banks in the process of providing credit may seem to be clearly understood by economists, bankers, and policymakers. But there are common misunderstandings about money creation, equilibrium, public money, central banks, and interest rates. The outlook for the global monetary system is not overly optimistic in the absence of […]

Cameron v Miliband: it’s about policies not personalities

by Michael Meacher.

Cameron at least has one special skill – to hold together an ungovernable party which is irrevocably split. He does not appear to have an ultimate belief in anything – only to sustain his own position and his party at whatever cost to the country at large. That explains his early embrace of driving an […]

A tale of two Labour coups

by Jon Lansman.

Today’s Times (£) reports last night’s reshuffle as having been to prevent a coup (later clarified to say a “backbench coup“). The BBC are trying to give the story legs. There certainly was concern about the possible actions of two right-wing backbenchers to further undermine Ed Miliband’s leadership, and the reshuffle was designed to strengthen the small band […]

The economy, the state and my crisis of faith

by Daniel McAteer.

Last week I had a crisis of faith in Labour. Looking at the Scottish polling, it looks as if Labour’s journey back to government may be longer and harder than we thought. Yet that is not what caused my questions to synchronise into a cacophony of doubt. My worries are for what happens if we do get […]

“The new mediocre” sustains inequality and won’t beat recession

by Michael Meacher.

The ‘new mediocre’, as the response from the deepest recession in post-war history is now often called, is an anomaly that cannot be accounted for by the factors that mainstream economic models normally consider important. One explanation which is gaining currency is that excessive inequality is to blame. Even Lagarde, IMF Director, admits that inequality […]

© 2014 Left Futures | Powered by WordPress | theme originated from PrimePress by Ravi Varma